Can We Be Honest With Each Other?

I think we’ve know each other long enough that we can be totally open and honest with each other (I reach over and touch you on the knee).  This is our pattern… First UGIC will make a big deal about some looming arbitrary abstract deadline (April 3rd, 2017) to present at UGIC 2017 in Park City.  Then as this psudo-deadline comes and goes, then the UGIC Board will magically extend the deadline a couple of weeks (April 17th, 2017) in an effort to make you think that you’ve been given a ‘second’ chance to do what you should have done in the first place.

But I’m going to break this pattern of placating semantics and manipulation.  Here’s the truth, the volunteers on the UGIC Board need some time to do the very labor intensive task of parsing through the abstract submissions, grouping them by similar topics, analyzing the agenda for scheduling conflicts, accommodating individual schedules, and honestly making an attempt to arrange a very dynamic and fragmented agenda into a smooth conference experience for UGIC members.  This literally takes hours and hours of focused effort (volunteer focused effort) to do right.
So now that I’ve let you see behind the UGIC curtain, I need you to do your part for this geo-relationship.  Membership participation at our conference (including presenting, displaying maps and apps in the gallery, and helping out where you can) is ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL to having a healthy professional organization and conference.  Currently we don’t have enough abstracts submitted to fill our conference agenda.  We need UGIC membership to step up and participate by submitting abstracts sooner rather than later.  So you and I can continue to play these hurtful games of deadlines, extensions, and waiting until the last minute (I put my hands flat against my chest and look at you with squinty eyes while I shake my head from side to side)… or we can be proactive and intentional about our geo-relationship and take responsibility for our own actions.  I’m so glad we had this talk.

SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT for UGIC 2017

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

I’d like to share a few details about the process of conference presentations as well as highlight the importance of presenting your work at UGIC.

Why should you present at UGIC?
Many of us have a concept in our minds that presenting at a conference is just, “not something I do“.  We identify ourselves as “non-presenters“.    For some it’s the fear of public speaking, for some they don’t want to take the time to prepare, some want to attend the conference and “take a break” and not stress about presenting, and others feel like their work isn’t worthy of sharing.  As with any decision in our lives, conference presentations need to pass our personal cost benefit analysis.  No matter how pious we are, we are still swayed by, “what’s in it for me” thinking.  Usually the personal benefits of presenting (and there are personal benefits) are not enough to motivate us to go through the effort of presenting.  However, when we consider the overall benefit to ourselves, to other UGIC members, and to the organization as a whole presenting becomes a little more tempting.  The following is a list of 5 good reasons to present at UGIC 2016.  It is not the only list nor is it the best list, but my hope is that after reading through these I can convince you to submit an abstract and present at UGIC.

5 Reasons to Present at UGIC 2017:

  1.  Participating in UGIC Keeps the Organization Strong:  UGIC is a grassroots ‘member driven‘ organization.  The health of any grassroots organization is directly related to the passion and activity of its membership.  If the UGIC membership becomes indifferent and passive then UGIC stops being a thing.  Conversely if UGIC’s members are excited about the group and actively promote the organization and it’s goals, then we become a strong and thriving organization.
  2. Presenting Adds Your Voice to the Discussion: At times we wrongly assume that there is only one ‘best way’ to do things.  In reality there can be many ‘best ways’ to do things.  This is true in geospatial as well.  Approach presenting at the conference from a place of adding to the conversation rather than trying to be the official way to do things.  Your way, might not be the best way, but it is A way.  And we become better geospatial professionals when we expand our view of the way things can be done.  Innovation is born of unique and diverse points of view.
  3. Public Speaking Sucks: You may argue that public speaking sucks… ah, touche.  Public speaking can be a challenge.  But honestly, the UGIC conference is really laid back.  We’ve never had any incidents of heckling or bashing of presenters.  It’s not like we are presenting before the Supreme Court or a Congressional Committee.   A UGIC presentation is usually done before a group of 20 to 30 kind and understanding colleagues who understand you better then anyone else. These people understand what it’s like to have Ar**ap crash on you, they’ve seen the blank looks on peoples faces when you tell them what you do for a living, they actually understand what a coordinate system is and how it… well I won’t get carried away.  The bottom line is that public speaking doesn’t get any easier than this.
  4. Presenting Builds Connections: When we present at the UGIC conference we cultivate connections with other UGIC members that we may not have meet otherwise.  Our more introverted members don’t really value ‘connections‘ but think about who is attending your presentation.  Not only are these geo-geeks like you, but they read your abstract and decided they wanted to come and hear your presentation over everything else offered at that time… including the option to go take a nap!  So even if we don’t value connections, we must see the value in connecting with people (real people, not internet tolls or avatars) who are interested in what we are doing.
  5. Personal Benefits (What’s in it for Me): When we present at the UGIC conference, we are forced to take time to organize our thoughts, define our business goals, spruce up a demo or some data, see things from other perspectives, and document our processes that we may not have done otherwise.  We are eligible for more credits toward our professional certifications.  We get more swag (presenters get extra conference swag).  We can add conference participation to our resume.  In many cases, potential employers are attending your presentation giving you the opportunity to show off your geo-ninja skillz.  You can expect a fan base to form as you present consistently at times evolving into an organized fan club including groupies.  It’s usually easier to sell your organization on conference attendance if you are slated to present at the conference.  Furthermore, you come across like a Boss to your boss if you are scheduled to present your work at a statewide geospatial conference… we won’t tell anybody how relaxed the atmosphere is.  In many ways, presenting at the UGIC conference legitimizes you as a straight gangster in the geo-spatial community.

Details About Presenting:

The first step in presenting is to submit an abstract.  An abstract is a short (1500 characters) description of your presentation highlighting the major points.  You don’t have to put together a polished product in order to submit an abstract.  Just define your idea and outline some talking points.  You will get to select a ‘track’ or a general topic for your presentation that will allow the UGIC board to group similar presentations into sessions or blocks of sessions. After the abstract deadline has passed the UGIC board will review the submissions and notify those selected to present… it’s not like it sounds, if you submit you will almost certainly be accepted although the Board may ask you to be flexible with the schedule and length of your presentation.  Then you will be scheduled into the agenda (you do have some input on when you are available).  Then you come and present at UGIC and you live happily ever after.

Types of Presentations:

  • 5 – 10 minute ‘micro-talk’ – This is just like it sounds, quick and to the point.  Simple and effective.
  • 20 minute breakout session – This type of presentation usually takes half of a breakout session and is the perfect length to do a brief overview of your work, maybe a short demo, and field questions.
  • 40 minute breakout session – This type of presentation is a little more in depth and is perfectly suited for a larger project or a team or group presentation.
  • 90 minute workshop – These are deep dive type sessions that either cover one topic in detail or cover a wide range of topics.  Only a few of these sessions are available.
  • Map Gallery – This is a chance to show off that really cool map or project you’ve put together.  The map galley is always a conference favorite as attendees browse the gallery during breaks and socials.  Map-geeks love maps so the Map Gallery is a great way to participate in the conference

The Cool Kids

Be like the cool kids… come to Maps on the Hill 2017.

Where: Capitol Rotunda (350 State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah)
When: Wednesday January 25th, 2017 from 10:00am to 1:00pm
Why: Even if you didn’t register a presentation for Maps on the Hill, if you are interested in the Utah geospatial community it is a great event to attend.  The focus of the event is the application of geospatial technology.  Many Utah GIS folks will be in attendance and it will be a great chance to network and see what others are doing.  So please attend, even if you didn’t register a map for display.  All the COOL KIDS are doing it!

UGIC 2017 Registration is Now Open

The UGIC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that the 2017 UGIC conference will be held from May 8th through the 12th, 2017 at the Park City Marriott Hotel in Park City, Utah. The Park City Marriott is a modern,  beautiful and comfortable venue that is well equipped to serve the needs of the premiere geospatial conference in Utah. Historically the UGIC conference has been an incredible value for attendees who need to maximize every training dollar, and this year will be no exception. The UGIC Board has negotiated a very reasonable accommodations rate of $118 per night at the Marriott. UGIC Conference registration will be $345.

REGISTER TO ATTEND

REGISTER AS A VENDOR

Can I Convince You to Participate in Maps on the Hill?

 

MOTH2017(2)Okay lets start with the where and when…
Maps on the Hill will be held on January 25th, 2017 at the Capitol Rotunda.  For those of you who are unfamiliar with Maps on the Hill let me describe it for you.  Maps on the Hill is an event that lets you put your best geospatial work on display in the ‘Times Square‘ of Government in Utah, the Capitol Rotunda.  The rotunda is a beautiful and historic setting you will not soon forget.  Your work will also be highlighted in a mapbook that is the de facto who’s-who of Utah GIS.

Still not convinced…

Let’s talk about the who…
Do you know who hangs out at the Capitol Rotunda?  That’s right, impact players in Utah Government.  Have you ever wanted the chance to show your boss how cool your work is?  You’d love to sit down and help the geo-challenged see that spatial light?  Well how about getting the opportunity to demo your best geospatial efforts face to face with State Senators or Representatives,  or maybe someone from the Governors Office, or a high level Department Director.
Government hoity toities don’t do it for you?  How about interested citizens, lobbyists, and a whole bunch of really cool geospatial geeks?  They will be there too.

Still not convinced…

Here’s why…
The people who hang out at the Capitol Rotunda influence resource distribution.  Those resources impact your geospatial operations, oh and maybe even your paycheck.  This is not an exaggeration.  In fact it is one of the driving goals of Maps on the Hill.  We want Government leaders to see and appreciate the valuable work we do.  We want them to know what GIS is and what it can do.  When they know the power of geospatial, they think about how GIS can solve the real world issues they face.  And when they feel like GIS is a tool they can trust, they will direct resources toward GIS.  And that is a good thing.

Maps on the Hill is only a thing for State GIS Orginizations“…
Are we still having this conversation?  Sigh and eye-roll.  Here’s how it works, the State is broken up into legislative districts which constitute local representation.  Those Senators and Representatives are interested in helping their local constituents.  Furthermore, they live in those districts and care about local matters.  And it works the other way as well.  Federal organizations benefit from State support.

The basic concept is that “a rising geospatial tide lifts all geospatial boats“.

So if I’ve convinced you to come and participate, hit the sign up page and reserve your spot.  Further details can be found here.  Registration closes on January 5th so be sure to sign up soon.

Maps on the Hill 2017

Maps on the Hill, sponsored by the Utah Geographic Information Council (UGIC) and AGRC, will be held on January 25, 2017. This event, in its sixth year, is a good opportunity for students and professionals to share maps, mapping tools, and mapping projects with elected officials, fellow practitioners, and the public. This year’s theme is “How to Tell the Story of GIS”. We hope to highlight how GIS improves quality of life, increases our understanding of the world, and helps us make better decisions.

New this year will be a competition, with a five-judge panel awarding honors to the best map displays. Bring your best and leave with bragging rights and some prizes!

Who should participate:
Individuals: Anybody who makes a map through their work or education.
Organizations: An organization that has worked on multiple mapping projects.

Maps on the Hill Event:
The map display event will be held during the 2017 Legislative session, in the Capitol Rotunda, from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm, with setup time beginning at 9:00 am. We request that at least one participant is present to discuss each map entry throughout the display event.

Display Types:
You can present hardcopy maps, interactive digital maps (you’ll need to provide a means to show it on a computer or monitor), or both. UGIC can provide electrical outlets (extension cords), tables, and easels, although bringing your own easel is encouraged, if possible. These items can be requested on the registration form.
The focus of the event is interesting maps or map technology projects that are applicable to a wide audience. While displays can be on any appropriate topic, presentations that may be of interest to decision makers are strongly encouraged. Marketing of specific products and services is discouraged.

Mapbook:
For the past several Maps on the Hill events, Mapbooks were made to showcase all of the map entries. The book has always been a great example of the interesting maps created and used in Utah. More information on the Mapbook will be sent to registrants as the event approaches.
Questions? Contact Joseph Rhodes at info@ugic.org or 512-294-3639.

Can I Convince You to Present at UGIC 2017?

Last week the UGIC Board opened the call for papers for UGIC 2017 at Park City, Utah.  We always have really interesting presentations by talented geospatial professionals at UGIC.

I’d like to share a few details about the process of conference presentations as well as highlight the importance of presenting your work at UGIC.

Why should you present at UGIC?
Many of us have a concept in our minds that presenting at a conference is just, “not something I do“.  We identify ourselves as “non-presenters“.    For some it’s the fear of public speaking, for some they don’t want to take the time to prepare, some want to attend the conference and “take a break” and not stress about presenting, and others don’t feel like their work is worthy of sharing.  As with any decision in our lives, conference presentations need to pass our personal cost benefit analysis.  No matter how pious we are, we are still swayed by, “what’s in it for me” thinking.  Usually the personal benefits of presenting (and there are personal benefits) are not enough to motivate us to go through the effort of presenting.  However, when we consider the overall benefit to ourselves, to other UGIC members, and to the organization as a whole presenting becomes a little more tempting.  The following is a list of 5 good reasons to present at UGIC 2016.  It is not the only list nor is it the best list, but my hope is that after reading through these I can convince you to submit an abstract and present at UGIC.

5 Reasons to Present at UGIC 2017:

  1.  Participating in UGIC Keeps the Organization Strong:  UGIC is a grassroots ‘member driven‘ organization.  The health of any grassroots organization is directly related to the passion and activity of its membership.  If the UGIC membership becomes indifferent and passive then UGIC stops being a thing.  Conversely if UGIC’s members are excited about the group and actively promote the organization and it’s goals, then we become a strong and thriving organization.
  2. Presenting Adds Your Voice to the Discussion: At times we wrongly assume that there is only one ‘best way’ to do things.  In reality there can be many ‘best ways’ to do things.  This is true in geospatial as well.  Approach presenting at the conference from a place of adding to the conversation rather than trying to be the official way to do things.  Your way, might not be the best way, but it is A way.  And we become better geospatial professionals when we expand our view of the way things can be done.  Innovation is born of unique and diverse points of view.
  3. Public Speaking Sucks: You may argue that public speaking sucks… ah, touche.  Public speaking can be a challenge.  But honestly, the UGIC conference is really laid back.  We’ve never had any incidents of heckling or bashing of presenters.  It’s not like we are presenting before the Supreme Court or a Congressional Committee.   A UGIC presentation is usually done before a group of 20 to 30 kind and understanding colleagues who understand you better then anyone else. These people understand what it’s like to have Ar**ap crash on you, they’ve seen the blank looks on peoples faces when you tell them what you do for a living, they actually understand what a coordinate system is and how it… well I won’t get carried away.  The bottom line is that public speaking doesn’t get any easier than this.
  4. Presenting Builds Connections: When we present at the UGIC conference we cultivate connections with other UGIC members that we may not have meet otherwise.  Our more introverted members don’t really value ‘connections‘ but think about who is attending your presentation.  Not only are these geo-geeks like you, but they read your abstract and decided they wanted to come and hear your presentation over everything else offered at that time… including the option to go take a nap!  So even if we don’t value connections, we must see the value in connecting with people (real people, not internet tolls or avatars) who are interested in what we are doing.
  5. Personal Benefits (What’s in it for Me): When we present at the UGIC conference, we are forced to take time to organize our thoughts, define our business goals, spruce up a demo or some data, see things from other perspectives, and document our processes that we may not have done otherwise.  We are eligible for more credits toward our professional certifications.  We get more swag (presenters get extra conference swag).  We can add conference participation to our resume.  In many cases, potential employers are attending your presentation giving you the opportunity to show off your geo-ninja skillz.  You can expect a fan base to form as you present consistently at times evolving into an organized fan club including groupies.  It’s usually easier to sell your organization on conference attendance if you are slated to present at the conference.  Furthermore, you come across like a Boss to your boss if you are scheduled to present your work at a statewide geospatial conference… we won’t tell anybody how relaxed the atmosphere is.  In many ways, presenting at the UGIC conference legitimizes you as a straight gangster in the geo-spatial community.

Details About Presenting:

The first step in presenting is to submit an abstract.  An abstract is a short (1500 characters) description of your presentation highlighting the major points.  You don’t have to put together a polished product in order to submit an abstract.  Just define your idea and outline some talking points.  You will get to select a ‘track’ or a general topic for your presentation that will allow the UGIC board to group similar presentations into sessions or blocks of sessions. After the abstract deadline has passed the UGIC board will review the submissions and notify those selected to present… it’s not like it sounds, if you submit you will almost certainly be accepted although the Board may ask you to be flexible with the schedule and length of your presentation.  Then you will be scheduled into the agenda (you do have some input on when you are available).  Then you come and present at UGIC and you live happily ever after.

Types of Presentations:

  • 5 – 10 minute ‘micro-talk’ – This is just like it sounds, quick and to the point.  Simple and effective.
  • 20 minute breakout session – This type of presentation usually takes half of a breakout session and is the perfect length to do a brief overview of your work, maybe a short demo, and field questions.
  • 40 minute breakout session – This type of presentation is a little more in depth and is perfectly suited for a larger project or a team or group presentation.
  • 90 minute workshop – These are deep dive type sessions that either cover one topic in detail or cover a wide range of topics.  Only a few of these sessions are available.
  • Map Gallery – This is a chance to show off that really cool map or project you’ve put together.  The map galley is always a conference favorite as attendees browse the gallery during breaks and socials.  Map-geeks love maps so the Map Gallery is a great way to participate in the conference.

First Call for Papers | UGIC 2017

2017_CallForPapers


Submit an Abstract Here

Utah Geographic Information Council (UGIC) is now accepting abstract submissions for breakout presentations at the 2017 UGIC Conference. We are proud of the excellent work being done by geospatial professionals in Utah. The UGIC Conference provides an excellent venue  to tell your story. Your content doesn’t have to be ground breaking work and you don’t have to be a polished presenter.  This is a conference of laid-back geo-geeks happy to be away from their office for a few days.

The strength of our grassroots GIS organizations is found in users helping users as we all become better at what we do. We would like to hear from a variety of colleagues: public and private sectors, tribal, federal, state, and local governments, educators, managers, innovators, beginners, students, experts, and everywhere in between. We want to hear from YOU!

Everyone is busy and nobody loves public speaking, but sharing your work with the community is worthwhile both for you and for all UGIC members.  All of us can think of a time where a conference presentation gave us a great idea or a new perspective on our work.  So please make the sacrifice to prepare somthing to share with your friends a UGIC.  Especially if you have never presented before!

Read more

Announcing the 2017 UGIC Conference

2017_SaveTheDate

The UGIC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that the 2017 UGIC conference will be held from May 8th through the 12th, 2017 at the Park City Marriott Hotel in Park City, Utah.  The Park City Marriott is a modern,  beautiful and comfortable venue that is well equipped to serve the needs of the premiere geospatial conference in Utah.  Historically the UGIC conference has been an incredible value for attendees who need to maximize every training dollar, and this year will be no exception.  The UGIC Board has negotiated a very reasonable accommodations rate of $118 per night at the Marriott.  UGIC Conference registration will be $325.  Details about plenary schedule, pre-conference training, technical sessions, map gallery, vendor sponsorship opportunities and social events will be released as we get closer to the conference.  Be sure to watch for surveys from UGIC as the Board determines the best content offerings for the conference.  Registration will be opening soon, so be sure to make budget and scheduling plans to join us at the 2017 UGIC Conference in Park City.

ESRI UC 2016

Many UGIC members make the trip to San Diego each summer to attend the ESRI International Users Conference.  This year was no different as Utah was well represented at the UC.

A few major themes coming out of the conference included:

  • 3D GIS – 3D is becoming mainstream functionality within ESRI’s products.  From desktop software and analytics to sharing maps in 3D in the web browser, 3D is a major focus of ESRI’s development efforts.
  • Big Data – ESRI is providing tools to leverage ‘Big Data’.  Visualization of very large datasets is made possible by massively scaleable computing infrastructure provided as a service.  This capability expands what is possible and brings Big Data computing to geospatial workflows.
  • Insights for ArcGIS – Insights is a new web application that allows users to visualize data (both spatial and non-spatial) in creative and interactive ways.  The app provides ‘cards’ consisting of maps, charts, and tables that are all linked to each other and symbolized in a consistent manner.  The Insights application is very flexible and configurable even for non-technical users.  Insights for ArcGIS is focused on exposing patterns in data that may not be otherwise accessible or apparent.
  • Drone2Map – Drone2Map is an application that leverages the new and exciting UAV technology to easily produce ultra high resolution ortho-imagery as well as DSM’s, point-clouds, and 3D models.
  • Free eLearning – ESRI is offering access to 100’s of self-paced eLearning courses at no additional cost for users who are current on maintenance.  ESRI  President Jack Dangermond said, “We are happy to offer organizations the opportunity to train more people in their workforce in how to use Esri ArcGIS at no additional cost.
  • GIS Evolution – ESRI see’s ArcGIS as a unified technology platform that supports multiple types of systems (system of record, system of engagement, system of insight).  Technologies such as web services, distributed computing, real-time data, configurable templates and apps, smart mapping, story maps and Big Data analytics are replacing older patterns such as client/server, static databases, and proprietary application development.
  • Field GIS Tools – ESRI is providing tools such as Workforce, Navigator, Collector, and Survey123 to better support GIS field operations.  We were able to see much of this technology first-hand from Chris LeSueur at the UGIC Conference in May.
  • Living Atlas – ESRI is providing 1000’s of ready to use datasets, layers, and basemaps (as well as millions of user contributions) through the living atlas.  In addition, ESRI announced a new partnership with DigitalGlobe to provide current high quality aerial imagery for the entire world offered through the living atlas.
  • Real-Time – There continues to be emphasis on integrating real-time data including geo-fencing, citizen and customer engagement, and many other examples of ‘high velocity data streams’.
  • ArcGIS for Adobe Creative Cloud – ESRI announced a new add-in that allows users to import ArcGIS Online map data into Adobe Illustrator (as vectors) to take advantage of the high end graphics design capabilities of the Adobe Suite of products.
  • ArcGIS Shared Code – For those of us who have been in the industry for a while, we remember a super useful little website called ArcScripts.  This site was loaded with cool scripts, tools, and ideas that were freely shared among GIS users.  Now that concept has been resurrected into a site called ArcGIS Code Sharing (codesharing.arcgis.com).  Users can log in and share their development work as well as browse and use the work of the collective.  This site which was recently launched is bound to be a valuable tool for many of us.

We are always proud of the work from UGIC members that is highlighted at the ESRI users conference.  This year we saw some work from UGIC members highlighted at the plenary session on the big boards as well as in the ESRI Map Book and on the GIS Managers Panel.

  • Ghosts of West Temple” Story Map from Salt Lake County
  • A Bright Idea” LED Streetlight Map from Johnny Snow of Springville City
  • “Grand Canyon National Park and Vicinity” from Andrew Keske of the USDA
  • Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Depiction for Environmental Impact Statements” from Timothy Love, Tony Korologos, and Dalinda Damm of the USDA
  • Location-Based Predictive Analytics in K-12 Facility Planning” from Michael Howard and Monte Hunter of Parkhill, Smith, & Cooper, Inc.
  • Modeling Tree Canopy Cover for Coastal Alaska” from Vicky Johnson and Robert Benton of the USDA
  • Existing Vegitation Mapping on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest” from Wendy Goetz of the USDA
  • Zambia-Change Detection” from Ian Housman and Mark Finco of the USDA
  • Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity in the Western United States, 1984-2012” from Linda Smith, Mark Finco, Jennifer Lecker, and Brad Quayle of the USDA
  • Wasatch Back Ski Resorts, Utah” from Matt Liapis of Mapsynergy, LLC.
  • Top 3 Things You Can Do for Maximum Organizational Value” from Wade Kloos of the Utah DNR

*The ESRI International Users Conference is a large event and though we’ve tried to include the highlights of the conference and Utah specific content, we’re sure to have missed something.  Please forgive us if we missed some relevant content.

The Importance of the UGIC Board Elections

As you may already know voting is now open for several positions on the UGIC Board.  You can review the candidates here.

Serving on the UGIC Board is a big responsibility that requires a real commitment.  Of course serving on the Board is a volunteer position.  Many of you may see the work that the Board does at the UGIC conference.  But, serving on the board is much more than just running around at the conference.  It takes a lot of effort from the Board year round to make UGIC work.  We are focused on facilitating connections within our community, supporting public outreach efforts, and acting as a unified voice for geospatial professionals in Utah.

Producing a successful UGIC conference is a major undertaking that keeps the Board busy for months.  There are a thousand details to work out.  If you have an enjoyable conference, it’s largely because the UGIC Board spent hours planning and working to make things run smoothly.

UGIC is really fortunate to have a lot of great candidates willing to serve on the Board.  So it is important for the UGIC membership to vote in this election.  Please take a few minutes to read through the candidates and vote.

It’s important.

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